Monthly Archives: June 2015

Fire, evil and tradition

Enough to scare the witches on their broomsticks. Photo: Mick. 2015.

Enough to scare the witches on their broomsticks. Photo: Mick. 2015.

When politicians talk about preservation of Danishness, I often wonder exactly what they mean. Perhaps Danishness is most clearly expressed through the traditional celebrations. The Danes do love a good celebration. At one point the calendar had so many holy days to celebrate that a whole host of them had to be combined into just one holiday, Store Bededag or Great Prayers Day. Far from all Danish celebrations are of the religious kind. Many, including those appropriated by Christendom, have their genesis in pre-Christian traditions and beliefs.

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Bureaucracy and suffrage

Every bridge (and there are many), every lamp post, every tree along the streets are adorned with election posters. Photo: Mick. 2015.

Every bridge (and there are many), every lamp post, every tree along the streets are adorned with election posters. Photo: Mick. 2015.

Today is election day in Denmark. The Danes residing here will decide who should lead Denmark for the next four years. It is a great day for democracy, the day when people can exercise their democratic right to influence the society they wish to live in. A society better for people, better for the planet.

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Suffrage and electioneering

A few hours after the election was called, young volunteers had decorated every fence and lamp post with election posters. Photo: Mick. 2015.

A few hours after the election was called, young volunteers had decorated every fence and lamp post with election posters. Photo: Mick. 2015.

It is election time here in Denmark. On 18 June 2015, Danish citizens residing in Denmark have the opportunity (the right, not the obligation) to vote for their favourite candidate for the National Parliament – Folketinget. The election was called on 27 May 2015 at 11am and just before 3pm when I left a seminar on innovation in the public serve, every fence and vacant wall space was filled with election posters.

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From slow start to page turner

imageIt took me awhile to get into the swing of Siri Hustvedt’s What I loved from 2003, but I have now finally finished it, reading the last third of its nearly 400 pages in just one day.

It is a moving tale of love and grief and the devastating moments that change the course of your life and relationships forever. Its narrator, Leo Hertzberg, is an academic art historian residing in New York. The story follows 25 years of his life when he befriends an artist, Bill Weschler, and tracks their lives alongside each other. The story is bookended so we understand it comprises Leo’s reflections on his life as an old man.

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